Love, what is it?

Over and over you hear people using and saying the ‘LOVE’ word.

It’s all over the place. You can’t move from zone A to zone B without hearing the word dropping from someone’s lips. The problem is, Is Love an universal word. But, what exactly does it mean? Not just to you, but to the other millions of people hearing that same word at the same time and with same meaning?

I think not.

Love is…

What you make of it. What you want it to mean to that person, people, organization, or other receivers of the word.

LOVE is a formality. We’ve all heard spouses say to their intended spouses, “I love you,” but sometimes one might want to gauge that love.

When Princess Lea told Hans Solo she loved him, her thoughts were not just “wham, bam, thank you ma’am,” but the trust and integrity two people built up between them.

When my husband tells me he loves me by saying “me too,” I know that he’s implying that his love is endless and he’ll always be there for me even though he can’t put it in exact words like I do.

When a brother tells a sibling that they love them, they’re telling them we’re family, I’ll have your back, and be your protector whenever and wherever you need me.

When a person says, “I love this movie,” they’re indicating they enjoyed the movie, was entertained by it, and would probably see it again this time with a friend.

Measurement of Love

If one was to take out a ruler and measure how much they loved a person or inanimate object, I wonder in how many inches, ounces, metrics it would take to describe their depth of love.

Usually depth of love means depth of feeling. When a person tells me they love broccoli over spinach, I know they’re giving me a preference over another vegetable. This love has much to do with the enjoyment of eating that particular vegetable. Its smell. Its taste. Its smoothness of soaking up salad dressing.

When people tell me they love the beach, love the Beatles, love Viggo Mortensen, they’re telling me what they like about the beach, what they enjoy listening to the songs of John, Ringo, George, and Paul. When women tell me they love Viggo as Aragorn in “Lord of the Rings,” they love his good looks, his ruggedness, his virtue, and integrity as an actor. They’re buying into his acting abilities playing the Philosopher King.

These ladies aren’t in-depth love with Mr. Mortensen the way they are with their husbands. If they are, it becomes an unrequited love.

Love is

overpowering, toxic, emotional, changes, grows, challenges.

NO two loves are exactly alike. Each person experiences their love for another person, celebrity, sports figure, political person in their own way and in their own manner.

Which makes me question why do people kill for love?

Until next time… .

About Lillian Cauldwell

Own and operate an Internet Talk Radio Network for 10 years, 2005 to Present Published Author of Non-Fiction Book, 1996, "Teenagers! A Bewildered Parent's Guide. Published Author of several fiction books, 2006 "Sacred Honor" and 20010 "The Anna Mae Mysteries: The Golden Treasure." Playwright of Theater of the Absurd and Black Comedies. Screenwriter, Black Comedies